Sometimes you start writing not sure where you are heading

Sometimes you start writing not sure where you are heading, but you just need to put out there. That you are picking up laundry and emptying the never ending dishwasher loads and taking kids to the dentist. And how that is fine, it really is. But also how in December, when it is dark both when you wake up and when you exit the grocery store at 4:15, and when there are five totally overcast days to every one kind of sunny one, that it also isn’t. It just isn’t totally fine. And one of the kids is sick again, in our family where we hardly get sick, but this fall has been one sickness after another. Now I am my 87 year old grandmother because I am less than one paragraph in and writing about how sick someone is. I’m feeling tired at the thought of three more meals to be made and fed and cleaned up tomorrow and at how I will most certainly be up multiple times with someone who is sick tonight. And how it is too cold to swing outside and look at the stars with anyone who might wake up.

Life in the 30’s has been described by Madeleine L’Engle as ‘the tired thirties’ an idea which has much been explored and agreed with by following writers. To me, yes, I see it, I see the tired, I feel the tired. Us mom’s with several small children, we all do I think, no matter how we balance this mothering gig with everything else we need to do. But I also feel there is something more, something lurking in these mid thirties, that could shadow slowly like octopus ink.

It can start with the daily monotony, with your own shortcomings, as another day passes with too much TV and too much bickering. Too much caffeine and too little sleep. Too much to do and too little time to do it. Too much work, too little results.

But that isn’t where it really blots out the light.

It blots in the friend having a double mastectomy and chemotherapy with two little girls at home. In the news of another family who lost their own little love, gone way too soon. In the poverty and the mental health issues and in the babies who have no one who makes them their priority and in the excess. I could go on.

Because this is where the thirties trump the twenties every time. The world is wider and our worlds are more vulnerable and we just see more bad things happening.

The thirties can threaten to be a godless dark pit.

So I call my husband to say I have to do this, then I text a friend to come with me, or I don’t. But either way I grab my running shoes and head to the track. Thank you sweet baby Jesus for the indoor track, because we have a lot of snow, and it gets dark early and it is very cold outside. And thank you for kindred spirits who like to run too. The talking about not much but anything you want, is one of the best kind of freedom. My feet take me around the track over and over, and I’m not a marathoner, I still can’t run too far or too fast but with each step I feel lighter. So I do it again the next night. Because right now, this is what is saving me.

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This entry was posted in Life in the 30's, Parenting, Spiritual discipline. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Sometimes you start writing not sure where you are heading

  1. oh leah. our friends just lost their 14 yo cousin to cancer, and it seems like everywhere i look another marriage is breaking up. it is grim sometimes, this advent when the light can be hard to see. maybe i need to run, too. to pound it out. i’m not getting any lighter eating christmas cookies, that’s for dang sure;)

    • Leah Colbeck says:

      I’m sorry for your friends family. And yes there are so many divorces aroun us too. Running helps for sure, it is like a wordless, pounding prayer. i like that. I’m hardly keeping up with the Christmas cookies over here too!

  2. Tammyy says:

    tired thirties…agreed!

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